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dc.contributor.authorSalazar, G. (Guillem)
dc.contributor.otherCornejo-Castillo, F.M. (Francisco)
dc.contributor.otherBenítez-Barrios, V.M. (Verónica María) 
dc.contributor.otherFraile-Nuez, E. (Eugenio) 
dc.contributor.otherÁlvarez-Salgado, X.A. (Xosé Antón)
dc.contributor.otherDuarte, C.M. (Carlos Manuel)
dc.contributor.otherGasol, J.M. (Josep María)
dc.contributor.otherAcinas, S.G. (Silvia)
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-30T12:11:33Z
dc.date.available2015-09-30T12:11:33Z
dc.date.issued2015-07-01
dc.identifier.issn1751-7362*
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10508/9731
dc.description.abstractThe deep-sea is the largest biome of the biosphere, and contains more than half of the whole ocean/'s microbes. Uncovering their general patterns of diversity and community structure at a global scale remains a great challenge, as only fragmentary information of deep-sea microbial diversity exists based on regional-scale studies. Here we report the first globally comprehensive survey of the prokaryotic communities inhabiting the bathypelagic ocean using high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. This work identifies the dominant prokaryotes in the pelagic deep ocean and reveals that 50{\%} of the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) belong to previously unknown prokaryotic taxa, most of which are rare and appear in just a few samples. We show that whereas the local richness of communities is comparable to that observed in previous regional studies, the global pool of prokaryotic taxa detected is modest (\~{}3600 OTUs), as a high proportion of OTUs are shared among samples. The water masses appear to act as clear drivers of the geographical distribution of both particle-attached and free-living prokaryotes. In addition, we show that the deep-oceanic basins in which the bathypelagic realm is divided contain different particle-attached (but not free-living) microbial communities. The combination of the aging of the water masses and a lack of complete dispersal are identified as the main drivers for this biogeographical pattern. All together, we identify the potential of the deep ocean as a reservoir of still unknown biological diversity with a higher degree of spatial complexity than hitherto considered.es_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Spain*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/es/*
dc.titleGlobal diversity and biogeography of deep-sea pelagic prokaryoteses_ES
dc.typeresearch articlees_ES
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationISME Journal, 1. 2015: 1-13*
dc.type.hasVersionAMes_ES
dc.publisher.centreCentro Oceanográfico de Canariases_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsclosed accesses_ES
dc.description.impact8,9510*
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/ismej.2015.137


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    Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Spain
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