Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorDurant, J.M. (Joel M.)es_ES
dc.contributor.authorHidalgo, M. (Manuel) es_ES
dc.contributor.authorRouyer, T. (Tristan)es_ES
dc.contributor.authorHjermann, D.Ø. (Dag Ø.)es_ES
dc.contributor.authorCiannelli, L. (Lorenzo)es_ES
dc.contributor.authorEikeset, A.M. (Anne Maria)es_ES
dc.contributor.authorYaragina, N. (Natalia)es_ES
dc.contributor.authorStenseth, N.C. (Nils Christian)es_ES
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-21T10:28:14Z
dc.date.available2014-11-21T10:28:14Z
dc.date.issued2013es_ES
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10508/8586
dc.description.abstractPopulation growth is affected by several factors such as climate, species interaction and harvesting pressure. However, additional complexity can arise if fishing increases the sensitivity to environmental variability. To predict the effects of fisheries and climate on marine populations, there is a need for improved understanding of how they affect key ecological processes such as population growth. In this study, we used a comparative approach investigating commercially fished species across different ecosystems: the Norwegian Sea−Barents Sea (Northeast Arctic cod), the North Sea (North Sea cod), the Atlantic Ocean (European hake), the Mediterranean Sea (European hake), and the Gulf of Alaska and Bering Sea (walleye pollock). Our objective was to compare the effects of commercial fisheries, age structure and environmental variability on population growth rate. We show that although all stocks experienced a decline in abundance, only 3 of them showed a concomitant decreasing trend in generation time (South Atlantic hake, North Atlantic hake and Northeast Arctic cod), suggesting a fishing-induced erosion in their age structure. Intra-specific analysis shows that changes in generation time triggered an increase in the relative contribution of recruitment to population growth. Furthermore, the contribution from recruitment to population growth changes due to large-scale climate indices or regional-scale environmental covariates, such as sea temperature. This study illustrates how and where the interaction between large-scale ecological patterns and regional/short-scale processes are important for designing management regulationsen_US
dc.language.isoeng
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.rightsAtribución-NoComercial-SinDerivadas 3.0 Españaes_ES
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/es/es_ES
dc.subjectBarents Seaen_US
dc.subjectMediterranean Seaen_US
dc.subjectBering Seaen_US
dc.subjectCoden_US
dc.subjectGadus morhuaen_US
dc.subjectEuropean hakeen_US
dc.subjectMerluccius merlucciusen_US
dc.subjectPollocken_US
dc.subjectTheragra chalcogrammaen_US
dc.subjectLeslie matrixen_US
dc.subjectFisheriesen_US
dc.titlePopulation growth across heterogeneous environments: effects of harvesting and age structureen_US
dc.typearticlees_ES
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationMarine Ecology-Progress Series, 480. 2013: 277-287es_ES
dc.description.versionPublicadoes_ES
dc.relation.publisherversionhttp://www.int-res.com/abstracts/meps/v480/p277-287/
dc.publisher.centreCentro Oceanográfico de Baleareses_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsopenAccesses_ES
dc.description.impact2es_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.3354/meps10308es_ES
dc.coverage.spatialStudyArctic Oceanen_US
dc.coverage.spatialStudyBarents Seaen_US
dc.coverage.spatialStudyMediterranean Seaen_US


Files in this item

    Show simple item record

    Atribución-NoComercial-SinDerivadas 3.0 España
    Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Atribución-NoComercial-SinDerivadas 3.0 España