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dc.contributor.authorJiménez, C. (Carlos)
dc.contributor.authorOrejas, C. (Covadonga) 
dc.contributor.editorRossi, S. (Sergio)
dc.contributor.editorBramanti, L. (Lorenzo)
dc.contributor.editorGori, A. (Andrea)
dc.contributor.editorOrejas, C. (Covadonga) 
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-20T07:24:20Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.isbn978-3-319-21011-7
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10508/11251
dc.description.abstractAt any scale, corals are live buildings. Their carbonate skeletons constitute three-dimensional frameworks allowing the delicate coral polyp to emerge from the sea bottom and populate vast areas of the ocean. The role that corals play in the oceans defies any attempt at simplification since it transcends the life span of the small polyp, geological time, and ecological space. Long after the polyps are gone, coral skeletons continue to play an important ecological role by hosting assemblages of disparate species utilizing the calcareous remains. However, the skeleton is one of the reasons coral has a privileged position in human culture. Coral has been regarded as mystic object and unique material of lapidary medical and apotropaic properties, this in great part due to the architecture and arrangement of the skeleton, growth morphologies, and color. Human history has been carved in chalk-white coral tombstones, on effigies, and on painted coral skeletons. Coral eyes of basaltic sentinels on Easter Island contemplate a plethora of coral artifacts scattered along the footpath of mankind: mortuary offerings, statues of pagan goddesses, helmets of Celtic warriors, military fortifications, and insular mosques shared the dream of the stone, when life seemed to depart from the mineral limbo, in the figure of the humble coral polyp. This chapter is the continuation of a personal journey into the coral forest of the world’s oceans (see chapter “The Builders of the Oceans – Part I: Coral Architecture from the Tropics to the Poles, from the Shallow to the Deep”). A selection of examples of human interactions with the “stone from the sea” will illustrate this complex and fascinating relationship with corales_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisherSpringer International Publishinges_ES
dc.rightsAtribución-NoComercial-SinDerivadas 3.0 España*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/es/*
dc.subjectCorales_ES
dc.subjectAmuletes_ES
dc.subjectApotropaic medicinees_ES
dc.subjectHistoryes_ES
dc.subjectFolklorees_ES
dc.subjectMythologyes_ES
dc.subjectFossiles_ES
dc.subjectArchaeologyes_ES
dc.subjectMythes_ES
dc.subjectSuperstitiones_ES
dc.titleThe Builders of the Oceans – Part II: Corals from the Past to the Present (The Stone from the Sea)es_ES
dc.typebook partes_ES
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationMarine Animal Forests: The Ecology of Benthic Biodiversity Hotspots. Rossi, S. (Sergio); Bramanti, L. (Lorenzo); Gori, A. (Andrea); Orejas, C. (Covadonga) (ed.). Springer International Publishing. Cham (Switzerland). 2017. 41 pp: 657-697*
dc.type.hasVersionVoRes_ES
dc.publisher.centreCentro Oceanográfico de Baleareses_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsopen accesses_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-3-319-21012-4_56


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