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dc.contributor.authorPierce, G.J. (Graham John) 
dc.contributor.authorHastie, L.C. (Lee)
dc.contributor.authorValavanis, V. (Vasilis)
dc.contributor.authorMacLeod, C. (Colin)
dc.contributor.authorPlotner, J. (Jonathon)
dc.contributor.authorRoel, B.A. (Beatriz)
dc.contributor.authorEllis, J. (Jim)
dc.contributor.authorBurns, F. (Finlay) 
dc.contributor.authorSantos, M.B. (María Begoña) 
dc.contributor.authorSaavedra, C. (Camilo) 
dc.contributor.authorGreenstreet, S. (Simon)
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-07T08:22:30Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10508/10070
dc.description.abstractAs part of a project which aimed to evaluate the feasibility of developing indicators of marine ecosystem status based on cephalopods, we analysed spatiotemporal variation in abundance,, and environmental relationships, using trawl survey catch data for cephalopods in UK waters (1980-2013) from Cefas and Marine Scotland Science databases. These data presented some challenges, notably the use of several different trawl gears, variable tow durations, and varying levels of taxonomic resolution. Accounting for gear type and tow duration, data were analysed separately for each cephalopod family and season to account for different phases of the life cycles being present at different times of year. The families investigated were Loliginidae, Octopodidae, Ommastrephidade, Sepiidae and Sepiolidae. A GAM framework was used to summarise spatiotemporal variation in abundance at family level and the relationships of spatial and long-term temporal variation with environmental variables, including depth, substrate (available for inshore waters) and several oceanographic variables (e.g., SST, chl signals), also considering fishing pressure. Long-term trends for each family varied between areas and seasons, although this may reflect the presence of several species within families. In Scotland, where Loligo vulgaris is rare and L. forbesii is normally distinguished from Alloteuthis spp., survey data suggested a peak in abundance of this species around 1990 and a generally increasing trend since the mid-1990s. Spatial patterns in distribution in all families were related to both physiographic and oceanographic features. As expected substrate type had most effect on those families in which eggs are attached to objects on the seabed.
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.rightsAtribución-NoComercial-SinDerivadas 3.0 España*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/es/*
dc.titleDistribution and abundance of cephalopods in UK waters: long-term trends and environmental relationshipses_ES
dc.typeconferenceObjectes_ES
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitation2015 Cephalopod International Advisory Council Conference. (06/11/2015 - 14/11/2015. Hakodate (Japan)). 2015. -. En: , .*
dc.date.embargoEndDateindefinidoes_ES
dc.publisher.centreCentro Oceanográfico de Vigoes_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsembargoedAccesses_ES


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